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How to access help if you have been sexually assaulted:

If you are in immediate danger call 000

For after-hours support call the Sexual Assault Crisis Line (SACL) emergency line on 1800 806 292

You can contact SECASA on 1800 806 292 Monday to Friday 9am-5pm to speak to an intake worker.

How to access help if you are experiencing Family Violence

If you are in immediate danger call 000

For after-hours family violence crisis support, contact Safe Steps on 1800 015 188 for 24/7 support visit: safesteps.org.au

For services within business hours, contact SECASA on 9928 8741.
For after-hours counselling, contact 1800-RESPECT on 1800 737 732

Emergency Services

Call OOO

Safe Steps

Call 1800 015 188

1800-RESPECT

Call 1800 737732

Tell someone you can trust
a family member, a friend, a neighbour or your doctor.

Recent Sexual Assault


Sexual violence includes any behaviour of a sexual nature which:
  • is unwanted
  • occurs without the victim’s consent
  • makes the victim feel uncomfortable or afraid

This behaviour can take various forms including:
  • Putting a penis, object or other body part (e.g. finger) in the victim’s vagina or anus, or putting a penis in the victim’s mouth without consent
  • Contact between the mouth and genitals without consent
  • Touching, fondling or kissing or being forced to touch the abuser
  • Being pressured or forced to look at, or pose for, pornographic photos/videos.
  • Exhibitionism (i.e. making the victim watch while the abuser performs sexual acts)
  • Unwanted sexual talking, innuendo or harassment

A person cannot consent to a sexual act if they:
  • Were forced or threatened to engage in a sexual act
  • Were asleep or unconscious
  • Highly intoxicated or affected by the influence of another drug, that they were incapable of agreeing to a sexual act
  • Did not understand the sexual nature of the act
  • Were mistaken about the sexual nature of the act
  • Were mistaken about the identity of the person performing it.
  • Believed mistakenly that the act was being performed for medical or hygienic purposes.

What to do if you have recently been sexually assaulted
  • If you are injured or unsafe call 000 and ask for Ambulance or Police
  • Get to a safe place as soon as possible; this may be yours or someone else’s home, a hospital or police station
  • Make contact with someone who you trust, who may be able to help you and is over 18 years of age
  • If possible, write down all details of the incident that you remember this includes: time and date, location, physical characteristics of the person who caused harm, and any identifiable information you may know of that person. This may be important if you choose to formally report the incident to the Police.
Who to talk to about my options?

SECASA and the Sexual Assault Crisis Line (SACL) provide 24/7 crisis-counselling support and can provide you with information about:

  • Reporting Options
  • Forensic Examination Process
  • Medical and Legal Rights


For Victim/Survivors

  • You can contact the SECASA-Crisis Line on 1800 806 292 Monday to Friday 9am-5pm to speak to a crisis worker
  • For after-hours support call the SACL emergency line on 1800 806 292

For Emergency Services Providers

  • If you are an after-hours emergency services worker and are calling about an after-hours sexual assault emergency please call 8345 3494. You can call 1800 806 292 if within regular working hours.

I am experiencing Family Violence


What is Family Violence?

Family violence is a range of behaviours in which someone seeks power and control over you. These behaviours can make you feel threatened, worthless or scared for your life or the lives of those around you.

1 in 4 Australian women report experiencing some form of family violence since the age of 15.

What does Family Violence look like?

Family violence is very rarely just one behaviour, or a ‘one-off’ incident. Often multiple types of violent behaviour can occur at the same time and may increase in severity as time goes on. These behaviours can fall into the categories of: physical, psychological, emotional, economic, social, sexual or spiritual.

It may include behaviour that is violent, threatening, controlling, intimidating and isolating.

Some common examples of family violence include:

  • Your partner threatens to hurt you or themselves if you disagree with them or attempt to leave the relationship
  • Your partner belittles you and calls you insulting names
  • Your partner controls all your money and spending accounts
  • Your partner always monitors your phone and requests to ‘track’ you through apps
  • Your partner denies you of basic items to looks after yourself and children i.e nappies, money for uniforms, groceries, costs for medical appointments and medications    
  • Your partner limits or stops you from spending time with family or friends
  • Your partner forces you to engage in sex or sexual acts
  • Your partner does not allow you to engage with your religious or cultural community
 
Who is mostly likely to be affected by family violence?

Family violence affects people from all ages, social, cultural and religious backgrounds. Certain groups of people such as women, people with a disability, members of the LGBTIQ+ community and first nations Australian’s are more likely to experience family violence.

Family violence most commonly occurs between spouses who are either married, separated or divorced. Family violence can also exist in other relationships such as violence between grandparents and adult children, siblings and violence towards pets.

Family violence is overwhelmingly committed by men against a female partner or ex-partner.

How to access help if you are experiencing family violence:
  • If you are in immediate danger call 000
  • For after-hours family violence crisis support, contact Safe Steps on 1800 015 188  for 24/7 support visit: safesteps.org.au

If you are not in immediate danger:

  • For services within business hours, contact SECASA on 9928 8741,  to speak to a duty worker and make an appointment for counselling and support
  • For after-hours counselling, contact 1800-RESPECT on 1800 737 732

Tell someone you can trust – a family member, a friend, a neighbour or your doctor

I have a disability

Click here for easy to read resources

Medical Information

If you have recently been sexually assaulted or experienced family violence you can choose to access a Forensic Medical Exam.

This is an entirely voluntary process, however by engaging in a Forensic Medical Exam you may be able to access a range of procedures to assist with ongoing investigation of the incident. Some of the procedures may include:

  • Collection of evidence i.e. DNA
  • Photograph any injuries or abrasions that may have occurred in the assault
  • Administer necessary medication and emergency contraception
  • Link you in to further ongoing medical support i.e. follow up appointments to test for sexually transmitted infections

You can elect to be supported by a Sexual Assault Counsellor/Advocate throughout this entire process.

For more information on how to book a Forensic Medical Exam you can contact the 24/7 Sexual Assault Crisis Line on 1800 806 292 and speak to a crisis worker.

The crisis worker can provide you with detailed information on your legal rights, options for police involvement, and what to expect throughout this process.

Making a report to the Police

An individual can choose to make a formal report to the police about a sexual assault or violent incident. It is important to remember that no-one is obligated to make a formal report as this can be an emotionally challenging choice to make, given the nature of the incident.

However many people feel that that by reporting their rape or assault to the police, it may assist in the investigation process and prevent others from being assaulted in the future by the same offender.

You can talk to a SECASA Counsellor/Advocate or a person you trust, to decide whether you wish to make a formal report of the incident.

Police procedures

The Government has adopted a Police Code of Practice for working with sexual assault victims/survivors who wish to make a formal report. You can expect the following if you wish to present to the Police to make a formal report.

The police are obligated to:

  • Take a victim/survivor to a CASA within 2 hours of reporting the sexual assault, if the victim/survivor wishes
  • Allow a victim/survivor to rest and receive medical assistance and/or support before giving their statement
  • Provide victim/survivors with written information regarding their rights and the support services available
  • Keep a victim/survivor informed of the progress of the Police investigations
  • Provide written reasons, on request, to a victim/survivor for any decision not to proceed with legal action against the accused

You can elect to be supported by a SECASA Counsellor/Advocate throughout all stages of this process.

Speak with someone today


For Victim/Survivors
  • You can contact SECASA on 1800 806 292 Monday to Friday 9am-5pm to speak to an intake worker
  • For after-hours support call the SACL emergency line on 1800 806 292
For Emergency Services Providers

If you are an after-hours emergency services worker and are calling about an after-hours sexual assault emergency please call 8345 3494. You can call 1800 806 292 if within regular working hours.

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